CT&D #21. Job Submission in Printing

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As physically attending press checks becomes less and less common, how will work flow and printing results be foreseeably affected

According to the textbook, not all jobs need a press check if all the intermediate proofs have been signed off as satisfactory which basically means that one is making sure that a print is going to end up being the way they and a client’s intends it to be. With that being said, as attending press checks becomes less common, I foresee the workflow for a printing company to increase.

Simply put, if a printing company aims to minimize (or completely forego) the time it takes for a press check to be initiated by either focusing only on physical details (accuracy, ink, scratches, stock behavior) and/or sending a proof straight to the press after reviewing and approving it thoroughly respectively, such company can maximize their time for processing more jobs and taking more customers. However, by achieving this, the importance in having printing results be correct is even more pronounced due to professional manner of which the company should hold (quality over quantity in theory).

Despite this, having a press check to determine physical errors in a print job is at least helpful to avoid reprinting which will rise the costs of production for a company all due to correcting a mistake. Either way, a worker responsible for pressing must adjust to this change by ensuring what goes in the press is the final draft and perhaps the press itself is functioning properly to reduce the chance of physical/aesthetic errors and must comply to timeliness if the volume of jobs does increase.

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