CT&D #15. Deconstructing a Print

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Take apart a die cut printed object (cereal box, envelope, pop-up book, etc…) and photograph it as a deconstructed sequence. 

I chose to deconstruct a pocket folder (dimensions: 11.4” by 9.4”, closed; 11.4” by 19”, opened):

The folder is yellow from the outside and on the border trim and pockets on the inside. The folder also has a 3 hole strip covering the center of the fold on the inside for holding papers.
Looking at the physical design of the folder, the outside edge had to be specifically shaped and folded in order to accommodate the 3 hole strip for the inside.

In addition, the inside pockets had to be folded and glued to a strip which borders the left and right sides of the opened folder for increased support of the pockets (so they can last a while without being ripped easily).

As my piece is a pocket folder, scoring and die cutting had to be done in the manufacturing process. As stated in the textbook, scoring ensures predictable folding and die cutting, the creation of a shape that is necessary for a printed piece to become a pocket folder.

The scoring in this case concerns the folding of the front and behind sections as well as the inside pockets and 3 hole strip (which itself is folded into two).

The following picture should show roughly what die cutting may look like for the folder:

Noting on the backside, the fold in the middle could be expanded as the holes are affixed to a small metal ring (which holds together each fold on the inside to make an attachment for papers).

Overall, deconstructing this folder gave me insight on how the manufacturing process works with regards to assembly and how each has to contribute to their task.

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