CT&D #24. Entering InDesign

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What processes for InDesign is most helpful as a beginner in the program? How will this help you in your design practice?

Not having used InDesign before, I found reading about it in a book necessary to use as a reference when I do eventually use the program in the future. With that being said, there are some notable processes I found helpful which stood out to me, the first of which I noticed was the drag and drop command. Using Adobe Photoshop frequently, I usually have to drag layers onto a window when working with combining backgrounds to an image, etc. However, when I have to drag one graphic onto another (separate windows), it is cumbersome to do this in Photoshop.

With InDesign, I found that you could simply drag a graphic directly from a window or even use Adobe bridge and drag and drop up to multiple files on top of an InDesign page. This process makes it easier for me to work with multiple images without having to use a directory window. Another useful process I found was using native files. As I work with many different files (PSD, TIFF, PDF, GIFF) often from other Adobe programs (Photoshop and Illustrator), InDesign has the ability to work with these formats. This makes it easy to manipulate works from these programs whether is it adding layers, drop shadows or even rasterizing them.

Without a doubt, some of these processes will help me with my design practice in that it will expand my scope of what I am able to do with my graphics from one program to the other if the situation calls for it. More specifically, InDesign has features that are not present in the other Adobe programs and helps with creating elements that can exist on virtually every page of a project one can work on.

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