AT&D #51. Object Oriented Programming

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Is it difficult for procedural language programmers to switch to an object-oriented language? Which is easier to implement, procedural languages or an object-oriented language? 

Based on my research, object-oriented programming has many pros and cons. The pros include: data encapsulation, modularity, and promoting code reuse. The cons include: the failure of the “everything is an object” practice, having static classes which are simply collections of methods, the trickiness of modeling problems, and the class library/framework explosion. With regards to the difficulty for procedural language programmers to switch to an object-oriented language, it is indeed hard. On the other hand, object-oriented programming is easier to implement than procedural programming because the langauge structures make the process easy and natural to follow through with.

My experienece in programming is limited but nonetheless, I did take a class in computer engineering where I had to deal with C++ programming and Mathlab. The class was difficult for me but I did learn how to code certain sequences to display messages on C++ (as part of regular exercises) among other things.

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